The Races of Indochina. พิมพ์ อีเมล
เขียนโดย Erik Seidenfaden.   

SEIDENFADEN, ERIK. THE RACES OF INDO-CHINA. JSS. VOL.30 (pt.3) 1938. p.57-59.

 

THE RACES OF INDOCHINA.

 

          Some   friends,   having   read   my   review   of   the   late   Sir  George
Scott's   book    " Burma   and   Beyond ",   published   in   J.
S. S.,   vol. XXIX,
pt. II,   have   drawn   my   attention   to   certain   statements   made  in   that
review    (p. 142)   and    asked    for   a   clarification   of   my   views   on  the
racial   questions   in   Indochina.    It   is   quite   true   that   I   have   quoted
Mr. F. H. Giles  (Phya  Indra  Montri)   as   saying   that   he   thinks   that   the
Riang   people   were   the   autochthones   of   Burma.   Mr.  Giles   now   in-
forms  me  that   by  saying  so  he  did  not  mean  the  true  aborigines, i. e.,
the   very    first   inhabitants   of   that   country,   but   only   a   very  ancient
people.

          Though   I  think   that   my   personal   opinion   has  been  expressed
elsewhere   ("Anthropological  and  Ethnological  research  work  in   Siam",
a  lecture   given  before   the  International,    Anthropological  and  Ethnolo-
gical  Congress,   London,  1st   August   1934,   published  in  J.
S. S.,   vol.
XXVIII.   pt. 1,   and   the   Asiatic   Review,  October  1934),   I   shall   repeat
here   that   according   to   my  opinion   the  Semang  pygmies  formed  the
aboriginal   population   of  Indochina.   The   Semang  may  be  immigrants
themselves,   if  so   they   have  come  from  India.   Furthermore   to  quote
Dr.  J. H.  Hutton   ( see   my   review   of   Sir 0.  Winstedt's    " A   history  of
Malaya, "  p. 154  )     the   Proto - Amtraloids   came   afterwards    and   the
result   of   their   union  with   the  Negritoes   were  the  Melanesoids.  The
proof   of   or   the  probability   of   the  correctness   of   this  theory  are  the
finds  of   negrito   skulls,   and  skulls  resembling  the   Papuan,  made  in
certain   limestone   caves   in   Tongking,   and   the   undoubted   strain  of
negroid   blood   in  many  tribes  in  Burma  ( the  Kachin )  and  Cambodia
( Khmer,  Samrae,  Kui   and  Chong )   and  also   in   certain  hill  tribes  in
Tongking.    The   Melanesoids   were   next   driven   out   or   absorbed   by
the  Austro - Asiatics,   i. e.,   the 
Môn - Khmer   people   coming   from   the
west.   Did   the   Austro -  Asiatics   come   from   west   via   India,   or   via
Central   Asia - China ?   I   believe   anyhow   that   some   of   them   came


58                                           E. SEIDENFADEN                                           [VOL.XXX

 

 

from  India,   from   where   they   brought   the   megalithic   culture  of   the
Mundas.  A   succeeding  wave   were   the   Proto - Malays  coming  down
from   the   Tibetan   inarches   in   Burma   to   the   Malay  Peninsula  and
Insulinde.   With   regard   to   the   Sakai   these   probably   represent   an
Australoid  people  strongly  mixed  with  Indonesians,  and  as  such  are
later  than  the  Semang.   Later   waves  were  the  Tibeto - Burmese  and
Shan  (Thai)  in  Burma ;  the  Thai  in  Siam  and  French  Laos  and Tong-
king.   The   
Annamites,   who   originally   were   a   branch   of   the   great
Thai  people,  came  from  the  coastlands  of  
S. E.  China.

          There  are  no  Melanesians  left  in  Indochina  or  even  in  Insulinde
now,   they   having   been   driven   eastwards   long  ago  to  New  Guinea
and  the  western  Pacific  islands.    All  the  other  races  are  still  to - day
represented  in  Siam.   There  are  thus  negritoes  in  Pattani  and  round
Pattalung  ;   Proto - Malays,   the   Selu'ng,   in  Puket  ;  Malays  in  Pattani
and  Nakon  Srithammarat,   and  plenty  of  Austro - Asiatics  represented
by  
Mon ;   the  Choug   in  Trat;   Khmer   and  Kui   in  Buriram,  Surin  and
Khukan  ;  
Lawâ  in  North  Siam;  and   Sô,  Saek,  Khamu  (1)  andKalu'ng
in  N. E. Siam  ;  and  even  a  few 
Kha  ( Brao  and  Hin  Hao )  are  found
along  the  banks  of  the  Mekhong.  Tibetans we have also in North Siam
in  the  form  of  the  Musso or  Lahu  or  
Kô as well as the Lissu with other
unclassified   Mongols   like   the   Maeo,   Yao   and   Tin.    Mr. Giles  says
that   when  the  Siamese  speak  of   the   Kariangs  meaning   the  Karen,
they  are  speaking   with   the  voice  of   racial  memory.   Now  the  Riang
are 
a  Môn - Khiner  people  and,  though  I  admit  that  my personal know-
ledge  of  the  Karen  is   too   slight   to  go  against  such  an  authority  as
Mr. Giles,  still  I  am  in  doubt  as  the  Karens,  so  far,  have  been  classi-
fied   among   the  Sino - Thai.    Their   language   is   certainly  not   
a  Môn-
Khmer  tongue.   The   Siamese   designation   of   the   Karen  as  Kariang
( Gariang )   may   be   due   to   a   confusion   of   names. 
Capitaine  Jean
Rispaud,    in  his  painstaking  analysis  called "  
Les  noms  à   éléments
numeraux    des    principautés    Tai",    J. S. S.,    
vol. XXIX,     pt. II,   p. 94,
says :—     " The   ethnical   Thai   designation   Yang   leads   to   confusion.
While   in   Siam  and  Burma  it  means  in  generality  Karen ( White,  Red,
etc.),   the  designation  Yang  dam  (black  Yang)   on  the  Sino - Burmese
frontier   stands   for   the  Riang,  a   group  belonging  to  the  
Palaung-Wâ
which   is  well   known   to   be  very  different  from  the  Sino-Thai  among
which  are  grouped  the  Karen".

1 )   also called Phuthu'ng. 

 

PT.I ]                                    THE RACES OF INDOCHINA                                         59

          Mr. Giles  thinks   that   there  formerly  existed   a  great  Khà  empire
stretching  from  Burma  in  the  west  to  Tongking  in  the  east,   and  that
the   Riang   formed   the   most   important   factor  in  this  State.  Mr. Giles
has  informed  me  that  he  is  preparing  a  paper  on  tins  sufeject which,
one  must  hope,   shall   prove   to   be  of   substantial   help   in  future  re-
searches   on   the   autochthonous   populations   of  the   northern   parts
of   Indochina.
 

 

Bangkok, 26th  May, 1937.

                                                                                              ERIK  SEIDENFADEN

 

 

 


ดาวน์โหลดเอกสาร
FileคำอธิบายFile sizeDownloadsLast modified
Download this file (vol 30 pt 1 page 57-59.pdf)vol 30 pt 1 page 57-59.pdf 271 Kb18909/20/10 15:04
 

ค้นหา

สถิติผู้เข้าชมเว็บไซต์

mod_vvisit_counterผู้เข้าชมวันนี้314
mod_vvisit_counterผู้เข้าชมเดือนนี้18799
mod_vvisit_counterผู้เข้าชมเดือนที่แล้ว22645
mod_vvisit_counterผู้เข้าชมทั้งหมด1981123

We have: 14 guests, 3 bots online
IP ของคุณ: 52.3.228.47
วันนี้: ๒๘ ก.ย. ๒๕๖๓